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10 Best Corded Drills 2021 – Reviews & Buying Guide

man using BLACK+DECKER DR260C Corded Drill

man using BLACK+DECKER DR260C Corded Drill

The corded drill is one of the most useful tools you can have around the house. It can create the holes you need and can also drive screws. Many models offer a reverse feature that allows you to remove screws. However, choosing a suitable brand among all the possibilities can be quite challenging and time-consuming.

We’ve chosen 10 different brands to review for you so you can learn more about each model. We’ll tell you how they did in the most important categories and let you know about any problems we had while using them. We’ve also included a short buyer’s guide where we take a close look at corded drills to determine the most important elements.

Join us while we discuss motor size, RPM, weight, cord length, and more to help you make an educated purccohase.

A Quick Comparison of Our Favorites

Rating Image Product Details
Best Overall
Winner
DEWALT DWD112 VSR Electric Drill DEWALT DWD112 VSR Electric Drill
  • 8-amp motor
  • All-metal keyless chuck
  • 2
  • 500 RPM
  • Best Value
    Second place
    BLACK+DECKER DR260C Corded Drill BLACK+DECKER DR260C Corded Drill
  • Compact design
  • Variable speed
  • Onboard bit storage
  • Premium Choice
    Third place
    Makita DS4012 Spade Handle Drill Makita DS4012 Spade Handle Drill
  • 5-amp motor
  • 600 RPM
  • Forward and reverse lever
  • PORTER-CABLE PC600D Corded Drill PORTER-CABLE PC600D Corded Drill
  • Lock-on button
  • 2
  • 500 RPM
  • 4 lbs
  • SKIL 6335-02 Corded Drill SKIL 6335-02 Corded Drill
  • Side assist handle
  • Variable speed trigger
  • Ergonomic design
  • The 10 Best Corded Drills – Reviews 2021

    1. DEWALT DWD112 VSR Electric Drill – Best Overall

    DEWALT DWD112 VSR Electric Drill

    The DEWALT DWD112 VSR Electric Drill is our pick for the best overall corded drill. This model features an 8-amp motor that provides plenty of torque for drilling through wood or steel. It can accept a wide range of bits and has a maximum capacity of 1⅛-inch when drilling into wood and ⅜-inch when drilling into steel. The motor can turn the chuck up to 2,500 revolutions per minute (RPM), and you can adjust it using the variable speed trigger that increases speed the harder you press. It’s not too heavy at 4.1 pounds, and it has a soft-grip handle to help reduce fatigue while you work. The cord is 8 feet long, providing you with plenty of room for projects around the home.

    We enjoyed using this drill while reviewing it and can find very little to put in the cons column. The one thing we did find was that it has so much power that it can be challenging to drive screws. It tends to jump off the head and can even damage it on occasion.

    Pros
    • 8-amp motor
    • All-metal keyless chuck
    • 2,500 RPM
    • Soft grip handle
    • Variable speed trigger
    • ⅜-inch chuck
    • 1 lbs
    • 8-foot cord
    Cons
    • Hard to drive screws with it

    2. BLACK+DECKER DR260C Corded Drill – Best Value

    BLACK+DECKER DR260C Corded Drill

    The BLACK+DECKER DR260C Corded Drill is our pick for the best corded drill for the money. It features a compact design and is lightweight at only 3.25 pounds. It uses a 5.5-amp motor to deliver up to 1,500 RPM with plenty of torque. The ⅜-inch chick can hold the bits most commonly used around the home, and it includes a 2-sided screw driving bit and an onboard storage compartment so you can keep them with you while you work.

    Some users commented that this model is a bit noisier than the average, but otherwise, it works very well. The 6-foot power cord comes up short on many jobs, though, so you will need a high-quality extension cable to use it for some work.

    Pros
    • Compact design
    • Variable speed
    • Onboard bit storage
    • ⅜-inch chuck
    • Includes screw driving bit
    • 1,500 RPM
    • 5-amp motor
    • 25 lbs
    Cons
    • 6-foot cord
    • Noisy

    3. Makita DS4012 Spade Handle Drill – Premium Choice

    Makita DS4012 Spade Handle Drill

    The Makita DS4012 Spade Handle Drill is our premium choice corded drill. It uses an 8.5-amp motor to deliver an impressive amount of torque but limits the RPM to 600, so it’s easier to use for mixing cement or driving screws. It has a forward and reverse lever and a variable speed trigger for maximum versatility. Two horizontal, rubberized grip handles minimize fatigue, while the back D-handle can rotate 360-degrees with 24 detent stops for more control over the angle of the bit. The engine is double insulated, protecting it from external debris, quieting the motor, and reducing heat. The ½-inch chuck allows you to take on bigger jobs than many other brands on this list.

    The downside to the Makita DS4012 is that it’s bulky and heavy at 6.2 pounds. If you don’t have several large jobs to tackle, this drill may be a little overboard for many users, and it’s quite expensive for a hand drill.

    Pros
    • 5-amp motor
    • 600 RPM
    • Forward and reverse lever
    • Rotating D handle
    • Rubberized grip
    • ½-inch drill chuck
    • Double insulated
    Cons
    • 2 lbs
    • Expensive

    4. PORTER-CABLE PC600D Corded Drill

    PORTER-CABLE PC600D Corded Drill

    The PORTER-CABLE PC600D Corded Drill features a 6.5-amp motor that can spin the chuck at a rate of 2,500 RPM. The keyless ⅜-inch chuck fits all standard bits and is easy to use. A lock-on button helps reduce hand fatigue when needed, and the 7-foot cord provides enough room to reach your project. It’s lightweight at only 4 pounds and is reversible, so you can extract tools or drill in reverse.

    The biggest downside to the PORTER-CABLE PC600D is that it’s one of the least ergonomic tools we’ve ever used. The trigger is too large, the handle is too small, and the tool is unbalanced and tries to nosedive during operation. Luckily, it’s lightweight, so you can still use the tool with these issues. We also found the belt clip strange on a corded device because it could cause a tripping hazard.

    Pros
    • 5-amp motor
    • Keyless ⅜-inch chuck
    • Lock-on button
    • 2,500 RPM
    • 4 lbs
    • 7-foot cord
    Cons
    • Not ergonomic
    • Nose heavy
    • Belt clip

    5. SKIL 6335-02 Corded Drill

    SKIL 6335-02 Corded Drill

    The SKIL 6335-02 Corded Drill is an extremely powerful drill that uses a 7-amp motor to deliver enough torque to drive a ½-inch bit with ease through steel or wood. It has a variable speed trigger that allows you to set your ideal speed up to 950 RPM, and its ergonomic design is comfortable to hold and reduces fatigue.

    The downside to the SKIL 6335-02 is that the side handle isn’t well secured and comes loose while working, and we fear it will snap in time. The chuck key is attached to the cord instead of the drill, which can be inconvenient if you are trying to change a bit quickly while in the middle of a job.

    Pros
    • 7-amp motor
    • ½-inch chuck
    • Side assist handle
    • Variable speed trigger
    • Ergonomic design
    • 950 RPM
    • 8-foot cord
    Cons
    • The side handle isn’t well secured
    • Chuck key

    6. Metabo D10VH2 HPT Drill

    Metabo D10VH2 HPT Drill

    The Metabo D10VH2 HPT Drill features a 7-amp motor that delivers plenty of torque and rotates up to 2,700 RPM. The speed is adjustable via the variable speed trigger, which has a special control dial built into the switch. Its 8-foot cord allows room to move while you are working, and it’s lightweight at only 3.3 pounds. The ergonomic rubber grip handle is comfortable and allows for long work sessions.

    We liked the power that the Metabo D10VH2 produces, but the precise control dial on the switch is flimsy and easy to turn while working, so your RPM is always changing. It also leaves a circle impression on your finger. Another problem is that the reverse switch is difficult to reach because of its position on the tool’s far side.

    Pros
    • 7-amp motor
    • Rubber grip handle
    • Variable speed trigger
    • 3 lbs
    • 8-foot cord
    • 2,700 RPM
    Cons
    • Precise speed dial
    • Reverse slider

    7. TACKLIFE PID03B Corded Drill

    TACKLIFE PID03B Corded Drill

    The TACKLIFE PID03B Corded Drill is a dual function drill with built-in hammering action perfect for drilling into concrete, and its 7.1-amp motor provides you with plenty of power to do so. It has 12 speed settings with a top speed of 3,000 RPM, while the hammering mechanism provides 48,000 beats per minute (BPM). You can lock the speed with a built-in locking mechanism, and the rotatable metal side handle lets you achieve the proper leverage. Its 10-foot power cable will allow you to reach most of your project without needing an extension cord.

    While the TACKLIFE PID03B is powerful, it may be a bit too much for many home users, especially if you won’t be drilling into concrete requiring the hammering action. This extra mechanism brings the weight up to more than 9 pounds, so it gets heavy quickly and can become tiresome to carry around. If you do use it to drill into concrete, you will need to be careful because it gets incredibly hot.

    Pros
    • 1-amp motor
    • 3,000 RPM
    • 12-speed settings
    • Lock speed button
    • Rotatable metal side handle
    • Dual functionality
    • 10-foot cord
    Cons
    • 03 lbs
    • Gets hot

    8. Hitachi D13VF Drill

    Hitachi D13VF Drill

    The Hitachi D13VF Drill is one of the more powerful drills on this list, featuring a 9-amp motor to deliver more than enough torque for most jobs, and its ergonomic handle helps you maintain a firm grip, even over long work sessions. The motor will spin the drill up to 850 RPM, and it has a variable speed trigger with a speed lock mechanism. It’s lightweight at only 4.6 pounds but has a ½-inch chuck for taking on bigger jobs. It also has a 10-foot power cord to reach most work areas easily.

    While we like the 10-foot cord on the Hitachi D13VF, it is thin and flimsy, and ours began to split and show the inner wires after only a few uses. The housing is also very thin, and the switch has a lot of play. Another thing we noticed is that the chuck isn’t balanced, and while it doesn’t interfere with the operation of the drill, it’s annoying and looks bad.

    Pros
    • 9-amp motor
    • Ergonomic handle
    • 850 RPM
    • Reversible
    • Variable speed
    • ½-inch chuck
    • 6 lbs
    • 10-foot cord
    Cons
    • Flimsy cord materials
    • Flimsy switch
    • Unbalanced chuck

    9. CRAFTSMAN CMED731 Drill

    CRAFTSMAN CMED731 Drill

    The CRAFTSMAN CMED731 Drill features a 7-amp motor to drive a ⅜-inch keyless chuck up to 2,500 RPM. It’s lightweight at only 4.13 pounds, and the ergonomic handle is comfortable to hold and reduces hand fatigue. It has a nice wide variable speed trigger with a lock-on feature, and it’s reversible, so it’s easy to remove misplaced screws.

    The biggest downside to using the CRAFTSMAN CMED731 is that it doesn’t have as much torque as many other models despite its 7-amp motor. There is no side handle to help you control it better, and the variable speed trigger is too sensitive to get your desired RPM consistently.

    Pros
    • 7-amp motor
    • ⅜-inch keyless chuck
    • 2,500 RPM
    • 13 lbs
    • Lock-on trigger
    • Ergonomic handle
    Cons
    • Not much power
    • No side handle
    • Hard to operate the variable speed trigger

    10. Ryobi D43K Corded Power Drill

    Ryobi D43K Corded Power Drill

    The Ryobi D43K Corded Power Drill is the final drill on our list, but it still has a few features that might interest you. It has a 5.5-amp motor that can reach speeds up to 1,600-RPM. It has a variable speed trigger and is lightweight compared to many others on this list at only 3.44 pounds. It has a ⅜-inch keyless chuck and comes with a tool bag for easy storage and transportation.

    The Ryobi D43K Corded Power Drill has a few downsides as well. Its 3-foot cord guarantees that you will need an extension cable for any job you do, and the chuck is rough turning. After several jobs, the chuck locked up, and we could no longer use it.

    Pros
    • Rubber molding grip
    • Variable speed trigger
    • ⅜-inch keyless chuck
    • Includes tool bag
    • 5-amp motor
    • 1,600 RPM
    • 44 lbs
    Cons
    • 3-foot cord
    • Cheap chuck

    Buyer’s Guide

    Let’s look at some of the most important things to consider when choosing a corded drill.

    Motor Size

    The first thing we recommend you look for when choosing an electric drill is the motor size. The amp rating is a good way to know how large the motor is, and more amps equal more power and torque. Torque is important for drilling into hardwoods, steel, and concrete, so if you have a lot of this type of work to do, we recommend looking for something with at least 8 amps. However, if you only intend to do occasional drilling into walls and door frames, you can get a smaller 5 or 6-amp motor.

    Speed

    The next thing most people look at is the speed, and you can tell how fast your drill can go by looking at the RPM. Higher RPM is nice, but it’s not as necessary as many people think, unless you need a specific RPM for a job you are undertaking. Anything over 500 RPM should be more than suitable for drilling holes and driving screws.

    A downside to having a drill with a high RPM is that it can be difficult to use them to drive screws because they turn so fast they slip off the head.

    Weight

    In our opinion, weight is more important than speed because there are many times you need to hold the drill at a strange angle or use it hunched over or above the shoulders. A fraction of a pound can make a big difference, especially if you have an extended work session.

    We feel that anything over 5 pounds is quite heavy for a drill, and that’s how we called it in our reviews. You will need to decide if there is enough value to justify the added weight, but for most home DIY repairs, a lightweight drill will work perfectly.

    Chuck Size

    The chuck size is important because it determines how large a bit you can fit into the drill. A larger chuck can drill larger holes and can take on bigger jobs.  Most of the drills on this list accept a ⅜-inch chuck, but there are a few ½-inch chucks as well. The ⅜-inch chuck should be more than suitable for most people, but if you intend to work on porches, decks, or other projects where you need larger holes, the ½-inch chuck will do a better job.

    person using DEWALT DWD112 VSR Electric Drill

    Cord Length

    The next thing to consider before making a purchase is the cord length. We recommend a cord that is longer than 6-feet to help you reach the various job locations in your home. However, we suggest picking up an extension cord anyway because a short cable can make it hard to get into position, and if you are always pulling the wire tight, it can cause damage. If you don’t have an extension cord already, we recommend a heavy-duty brand to allow enough current to travel to the drill, especially if your drill uses more than 6 amps.

    Ergonomics

    Ergonomics is worth extensive consideration because holding the drill can quickly become very tiresome if it doesn’t have the proper design. Hand cramps are very common, as are sore fingers from holding in the trigger. A properly shaped handle with a soft rubber coating can make a big difference in how long you can work. Some models include a lock-on switch that allows the device to keep drilling when you let go of the trigger reducing hand fatigue.

    Extra Features

    We mentioned the lock-on feature, but there are several other features you might look for if you need them.

    Speed Lock

    One feature is a speed lock that lets you set a speed your drill cannot go beyond. This feature is especially handy if you have difficulty keeping the bit on the tip of the screw when driving them.

    Headlight

    Some models may have a handy LED headlight that will illuminate the work surface, making it easy to see, especially in low light conditions.

    Hammer action

    A hammer action drill can be called an impact or percussive drill. This mechanism produces a rapid succession of short bursts to smash the material you are drilling. It allows you to drill faster and extends the life of your bit. The downside to this mechanism is that it adds a lot of weight to the drill and isn’t a very useful feature for most people, even if you could shut it off. We only recommend purchasing a drill with hammer action if you see yourself drilling into concrete.

    Protective Case

    Drill bits often come in a protective case, but the drill will need one as well to protect it from damage. Dust and other contaminants can work their way into the motor, shortening the lifespan of the tool. Falls and collisions can also damage the tool if it is not protected.

    Also See: Best Cordess Drills

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    Conclusion

    When choosing a corded drill, we feel it’s hard to beat the DEWALT DWD112 VSR Electric Drill. This model is our pick for the best overall because it features a powerful 8-amp motor and a long 8-foot power cable. It’s lightweight, has a rubber grip, can reach up to 2,500 RPM, and has a variable speed trigger. Another smart choice is our pick for the best value, the BLACK+DECKER DR260C Corded Drill. It has many of the same features as our top model but on a smaller scale. The 5.5-amp motor is suitable for hundreds of DIY jobs around the home, and at just a little over 3 pounds, you’ll have no trouble doing them all.

    We hope you have enjoyed reading over our reviews, and they have helped you find the right model for your home. We hope our buyer’s guide has helped answer any questions you had when you began. If you think it can help others, please share this guide to the best-corded drills on Facebook and Twitter.

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