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10 Best Cucumber Varieties to Grow at Home

Dill pickled cucumbers in jars

If you’re looking for a new and exciting vegetable to grow in your garden, then you should definitely try cucumbers! These vegetables are easy to grow, take up little space, and require minimal maintenance. But with so many different cucumber varieties, picking out the best to grow can be difficult. If this sounds like your predicament, we’re here to help!

Here are 10 of the best cucumber varieties to grow at home. If you’re ready to add some delicious cucumbers to your garden, keep reading.

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The 10 Cucumber Varieties to Grow at Home

1. Marketmore Cucumber (Cucumis sativus)

Fresh Homegrown Garden Heirloom Marketmore 76 Cucumber
Image By: Gabe Lyon, Shutterstock
Size of fruit: 7 to 9 inches
Number of fruits per plant: About a dozen
Blooming season: Early to midsummer
USDA Hardiness Zones: All
Sun exposure: Full sun
Soil type: Well-drained, fertile soil
Color: Dark green
Ripens: Mid to late summer

Developed at Cornell in 1968, the Marketmore cucumber is one of the most popular varieties, and for good reason! This variety is easy to grow and produces an abundance of dark green cucumbers. The fruits are typically seven to nine inches long and have crisp, juicy flesh. This variety is also relatively disease-resistant, making it a great choice for beginner gardeners.


2. Lemon Cucumber (Cucumis sativus .Lemon’)

lemon (or apple) cucumbers on rough white painted wood surface
Image Credit: marekuliasz, Shutterstock
Size of fruit: About the size of a lemon
Number of fruits per plant: Five to seven
Blooming season: Early to midsummer
USDA Hardiness Zones: All
Sun exposure: Full sun to partial shade
Soil type: Well-drained, fertile soil
Color: Yellow-green
Ripens: Early to mid-summer

Lemon cucumbers are a unique variety perfect for adding a pop of color to your garden. As their name suggests, these cucumbers are lemon-shaped and have a yellow-green tinge to them. They’re also on the smaller side, typically only reaching about the size of a lemon. One advantage of this variety is that it outlasts most other varieties, producing fruits even much later in the season. Lemon cucumbers are best eaten fresh and make a great addition to salads or as a garnish.


3. Armenian Cucumber (Cucumis melo var. flexuosus)

Sliced fresh raw Armenian cucumber close up
Image Credit: Picture Partners, Shutterstock
Size of fruit: 12 to 24 inches
Number of fruits per plant: Three to five
Blooming season: Early to midsummer
USDA Hardiness Zones: All
Sun exposure: Full sun to partial shade
Soil type: Well-drained, fertile soil
Color: Light green with dark green stripes
Ripens: Mid to late summer

Famously dubbed “the zucchini of cucumbers,” Armenian cucumbers are a long, slender, curved variety that can grow up to two feet in length! These cucumbers have light green skin with dark green stripes and are typically very smooth. Flavorwise, you get a mild flavor, somewhat like a watermelon rind. The texture is crisp and “carroty”.

Technically, the Armenian cucumber isn’t a “real” cucumber but rather a type of melon. However, it is often grouped with cucumbers due to their similar appearance and taste. It’s the perfect addition to your home garden.


4. Beit Alpha Cucumber (Cucumis sativus .Beit Alpha’)

cucumbers
Image Credit: Sweetaholic, Pixabay
Size of fruit: About six inches
Number of fruits per plant: Six to eight
Blooming season: Early to midsummer
USDA Hardiness Zones: All
Sun exposure: Full sun
Soil type: Well-drained, fertile soil
Color: Bright green
Ripens: Mid to late summer

The Beit Alpha cucumber is an exceptionally sweet variety that originates from Israel. It’s a small cucumber, typically only reaching about six inches in length, with bright green skin and a lovely crunch to it. Beit Alpha cucumbers are best eaten fresh but can also be pickled.

If you’re looking for a delicious and unique cucumber to add to your home garden, the Beit Alpha is a great choice. However, you’ll need to take extra care of this sensitive variety for the best results. Also, be sure to harvest regularly for consistent production.


5. Boothby’s Blond Cucumber (Cucumis sativus .Boothby’s Blond Cucumber’)

Boothby's Blond Cucumber
Image Credit: Lipatova Maryna, Shutterstock
Size of fruit: About three to five inches
Number of fruits per plant: Two to three
Blooming season: Early to midsummer
USDA Hardiness Zones: All
Sun exposure: Full sun to partial shade
Soil type: Well-drained, fertile soil
Color: Pale yellow-green
Ripens: Mid to late summer

Boothby’s Blond cucumbers are a unique variety that is pale yellow-green in color with tiny black spines. These cucumbers have a uniquely pleasant flavor and are super juicy and crispy, minus the white cuke bitterness. They’re typically about three to five inches long and have smooth skin. Boothby’s Blond cucumbers are best eaten fresh but can also be pickled or tossed in salads.

This is a great cucumber for beginner gardeners as it’s relatively easy to grow. However, make sure you harvest them before they become shiny yellow, or you’ll be left with a cucumber that’s too bitter to eat


6. Boston Pickling Cucumber (Cucumis sativus ‘Boston Pickling’)

Cucumbers
Image Credit: krzys16, Pixabay
Size of fruit: About four inches
Number of fruits per plant: Five to seven
Blooming season: Early to midsummer
USDA Hardiness Zones: All
Sun exposure: Full sun to partial shade
Soil type: Well-drained, fertile soil
Color: Dark green
Ripens: Mid to late summer

The Boston Pickling cucumber is an old heirloom that traces its origin back to the 1800s. This is another small variety that’s dark green in color. These cucumbers are only about four inches long, but they’re super crunchy. As their name suggests, Boston Pickling cucumbers are typically used for pickling because it’s very receptive to pickling spices. However, they can also be eaten fresh or tossed in salads.

If you want to grow this variety at home, keep in mind that it’s best suited for cooler climates. It’s also a fairly disease-resistant cucumber, which is always a bonus.


7. Burpless Cucumber (Cucumis sativus .Burpless’)

Burpless Cucumber
Image Credit: Larry Korb, Shutterstock
Size of fruit: About eight inches
Number of fruits per plant: Three to five
Blooming season: Early to midsummer
USDA Hardiness Zones: All
Sun exposure: Full sun to partial shade
Soil type: Well-drained, fertile soil
Color: Bright green
Ripens: Mid to late summer

The term “burpless” means that this variety doesn’t cause indigestion or burping like most other cucumbers. This is another fairly easy-to-grow cucumber often found in grocery stores. These bright green cucumbers have a mild flavor and a crunchy texture. They grow to about eight inches long and have smooth skin. Burpless cucumbers are best eaten fresh but can also be pickled or used in salads.

This is a fairly easy-to-grow cucumber, which makes it a great choice for beginner gardeners. However, you’ll need to take extra care to protect the fruits from pests and diseases.


8. Sugar Crunch Cucumber (Cucumis sativus .Sugar Crunch’)

Sugar Crunch Cucumber
Image Credit: DMC-13, Shutterstock
Size of fruit: About six inches
Number of fruits per plant: Three to five
Blooming season: Early to midsummer
USDA Hardiness Zones: All
Sun exposure: Full sun to partial shade
Soil type: Well-drained, fertile soil
Color: Bright green with white stripes
Ripens: Mid to late summer

The Sugar Crunch cucumber is a hybrid cucumber variety that’s fun, unique, and perfect for snacking. These cucumbers are bright green with white stripes and have a sweet flavor. They’re typically only about six inches long, but they’re super crunchy. Sugar Crunch cucumbers are best eaten fresh but can also be used in salads or as a garnish.

This cucumber is fairly easy to grow and is also resistant to the mosaic virus. Sugar Crunch cucumbers are best suited for cooler climates.


9. Sweet Success (Cucumis sativus .Sweet Success’)

cucumber and tomato plants
Image Credit: planet_fox, Pixabay
Size of fruit: About eight inches
Number of fruits per plant: Three to five
Blooming season: Early to midsummer
USDA hardiness Zones: All
Sun exposure: Full sun to partial shade
Soil type: Well-drained, fertile soil
Color: Bright green
Ripens: Mid to late summer

The Sweet Success cucumber is a hybrid variety known for its sweetness. This 1983 All-American Selections winner is popular for its remarkably sweet flavor. These cucumbers are bright green and have a crisp texture. They grow to about eight inches in length and are best eaten fresh or used in salads.


10. Supremo (Cucumis sativus .Supremo’)

Supremo Cucumber
Image Credit: MT PhotoLife, Shutterstock
Size of fruit: About three to four inches
Number of fruits per plant: Three to five
Blooming season: Early to midsummer
USDA Hardiness Zones: All
Sun exposure: Full sun to partial shade
Soil type: Well-drained, fertile soil
Color: Bright green
Ripens: Mid to late summer

The Supremo cucumber is a hybrid variety that’s known for its small size and sweetness. These cucumbers are only about three to four inches long, but they’re very crisp and have a sweet flavor. They have a rich, bright green color and are fairly easy to grow.

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Final Thoughts

If you’re looking for a versatile and delicious vegetable to add to your garden, cucumber is a great choice. With so many different varieties available, there’s sure to be one that’s perfect for you. Whether you want an early-bearing variety or one that’s resistant to disease, there’s definitely a cucumber out there for you.


Featured Image Credit: Photo Mix, Pixabay

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