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9 Best Bandsaw Blades in 2023 — Reviews & Top Picks

bandsaw cut

bandsaw cut

Bandsaws are an essential workshop addition, thanks to their precision, versatility, and clean results. But while a single unit may be able to handle a thousand different projects, there are also a thousand blades you can pair with it, with each one having a particular point and purpose.

As you’re outfitting your bandsaw, landing on the perfect saw blade can become an uncertain and confusing journey. There are numerous styles and sizes to consider, but we’ll point you in the right direction with these reviews of the nine best bandsaw blades in 2022.

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A Glance at Our Winners in 2023

Rating Image Product Details
Best Overall
Winner
Timber Wolf Bandsaw Blade Timber Wolf Bandsaw Blade
  • Thin kerf reduces chipping and resistance
  • High-quality milled silicon steel blades are efficient, durable, and precise
  • Flexible material keeps the blade cool and resists breakage
  • Best Value
    Second place
    Olson Saw Bandsaw Blades Olson Saw Bandsaw Blades
  • Easy to use and install
  • Low price point
  • Versatile for use with several machines and materials
  • Premium Choice
    Third place
    Lenox Classic Tuff Tooth Bandsaw Blade Lenox Classic Tuff Tooth Bandsaw Blade
  • Wavy tooth design ensures straight cuts in thin materials
  • Bimetal construction can handle steel, aluminum, plastic, wood, and more
  • High-speed tooth edge reduces heat damage and wear
  • Best Portable Bandsaw Blade
    DEWALT Portable Bandsaw Blade DEWALT Portable Bandsaw Blade
  • Cobalt addition improves heat and wear-reduction
  • Alloy steel backing limits wear
  • 24 TPI allows for smooth cuts in thin metal and tubing
  • POWERTEC 1310 Bandsaw Blade POWERTEC 1310 Bandsaw Blade
  • Available in several TPIs and widths to suit various needs
  • Solid welding prevents breakage and maintains consistent teeth spacing
  • Triple-tempered, flexible carbon steel resists wear and heat
  • The 9 Best Bandsaw Blades

    1. Timber Wolf Bandsaw Blade – Best Overall

    Timber Wolf Bandsaw Blade

    Material: Carbon steel
    Uses: Ripping and resawing wood

    The Timber Wolf 3 TPI ½” bandsaw blade is a dream for ripping and resawing various kinds of lumber. The brand leans heavily into the tooth construction, which it says is 50% sharper than crush-ground or stamped blades and 20% harder than typical carbon steel teeth.

    With its thickness, 6.5° rake, and low TPI, the Timber Wolf is a fast-acting, clog-free and durable straight-cutter. It has a thin kerf, and despite its aggressive cutting capabilities, the finish is surprisingly clean. The steel is more flexible, and it includes instructions on setting it up for low tension, helping you prevent undue wear on your equipment. Given the quality of the cut and the confidence you gain against breakage and extra maintenance, the Timber Wolf’s superior benefits make it the best overall bandsaw blade.

    Pros
    • Thin kerf reduces chipping and resistance
    • High-quality milled silicon steel blades are efficient, durable, and precise
    • Flexible material keeps the blade cool and resists breakage
    • Positive Claw design increases cut speed and improves the finish
    Cons
    • High price point

    2. Olson Saw Bandsaw Blades – Best Value

    Olson Saw 55756 Bench Top Band Saw Blade

    Material: Alloy steel
    Uses: Wood finishing

    Olson Saw gives us the best bandsaw blades for the money, inexpensive yet adaptable blades for numerous projects. The linked 14 TPI ¼” blade is ideal for slow-cutting hard materials or lining up a crisp finish for wood.

    For the price, the cut quality of the Olson Saw is remarkably smooth, and the blade is easy to install and handle, ideal for hobbyists and professionals alike. With a hook shape, the high carbon steel teeth still make quick work of more precise cuts.

    Pros
    • Easy to use and install
    • Low price point
    • Versatile for use with several machines and materials
    Cons
    • Not as durable as some higher-priced models

    3. Lenox Classic Tuff Tooth Bandsaw Blade – Premium Choice

    Lenox Classic Tuff Tooth Band Saw Blade

    Material: Bimetal
    Uses: Wood, plastic, metal, stone

    When you need a tough, multi-purpose blade, the Lenox Classic Tuff Tooth is the cream of the crop. It’s pricey, but the long-term value is excellent, as it can handle all kinds of wood and metal cutting tasks.

    Available in 18 or 14 TPI options, the blade has a wavy tooth set design, allowing you to get smooth, thin cuts. It can also withstand wear as it cuts through problem materials like steel due to the high-speed steel tips. Add in the ¾” thickness and hook tooth design, and you have the perfect blade for powering through straight cuts in hard materials without stripping teeth. The Lenox can handle it all, whether you’re cutting through alloy steel or ripping long hardwood runs.

    Pros
    • Wavy tooth design ensures straight cuts in thin materials
    • Bimetal construction can handle steel, aluminum, plastic, wood, and more
    • High-speed tooth edge reduces heat damage and wear
    Cons
    • More expensive than many other bandsaw blades
    • Can run loud

    4. DEWALT Portable Bandsaw Blade — Best Portable Bandsaw Blade

    DEWALT Portable Band Saw Blade

    Material: Bimetal
    Uses: Metal

    Another bimetal design, DEWALT’s portable bandsaw blade works with portable bandsaws for on-site cutting. The Matrix II high-speed teeth can handle hard materials, while an 8% cobalt content further enhances the wear and heat resistance. At 24 TPI, it’s an excellent option for cutting thin metal without jolting or vibrating.

    Pros
    • Cobalt addition improves heat and wear-reduction
    • Alloy steel backing limits wear
    • 24 TPI allows for smooth cuts in thin metal and tubing
    • Good price point for the quality
    Cons
    • Prone to breaking at the weld

    5. POWERTEC 1310 Bandsaw Blade

    POWERTEC 13100 Saw Blade

    Material: Carbon steel
    Uses: Wood, plastic, some non-ferrous metals

    The POWERTEC 1310 59 ½” bandsaw blade comes in several pitches and widths to match various applications. The regular tooth style doesn’t lend itself to speedy cutting, but the all-purpose design supplies smooth cuts for flawless results.

    No matter the project, there’s a POWERTEC 1310 blade for you, all made with extra-hard carbon steel that can cut through wood and plastic like butter. The one exception is the bi-metal 14 TPI option, featuring triple-tempered high-speed carbon steel for powering through metals. With the flexible blades available in thicknesses between ⅛” and ½” and TPIs as low as 6, you’ll be sure to find the perfect tool for clean cuts, whether you do precision shaping or fast ripping and resawing.

    Pros
    • Available in several TPIs and widths to suit various needs
    • Solid welding prevents breakage and maintains consistent teeth spacing
    • Triple-tempered, flexible carbon steel resists wear and heat
    Cons
    • Relatively short band may wear down quickly
    • Weld point can sometimes cause vibration

    6. POWERTEC 1313 Bandsaw Blade

    POWERTEC 13132 Saw Blade

    Material: Carbon steel
    Uses: Wood, plastic

    Another excellent general-use option, the POWERTEC 1313 62” bandsaw blade features raker set regular teeth consisting of high-grade alloy steel. The result is a versatile blade that delivers smooth cuts without sacrificing too much speed.

    Pitches on the POWERTEC range from 6 TPI to 14 TPI, while widths run as narrow as 3/16” and as thick as ½.” There’s no issue finding the right blade for general-purpose cutting.

    Pros
    • Available in several pitches and widths for various uses
    • High-grade, flexible carbon steel resists heat and wear
    • Strong weld for seamless cutting
    Cons
    • Teeth may wander and leave a wider cut path
    • Doesn’t last as long as other reviewed blades

    7. Makita B-405 Compact Portable Bandsaw Blade

    Makita B-40559 Compact Portable Band Saw Blade

    Material: Bimetal
    Uses: Metal

    The Makita B-405 is a portable bandsaw blade for on-site pipe and thin metal cutting. It has three available pitches (14, 18, and 24 TPI), so you can pick the appropriate one for the cutting thickness.

    Makita markets this blade as having an improved weld, so you can expect it to last longer without breaking. And with the wavy set tooth design, there’s less stress on the high-speed teeth, and you can be confident using the same blade on various material thicknesses.

    Pros
    • Strong, sharp bi-metal blades provide long-lasting performance
    • Various pitches to match cutting applications
    • Wavy set tooth layout allows for smooth cuts on thin metal and puts less stress on teeth
    Cons
    • Relatively expensive portable bandsaw blade set

    8. BOSCH BS5678-6W General Purpose Stationary Bandsaw Blade

    BOSCH General Purpose Stationary Band Saw Blade

    Material: Steel
    Uses: Wood

    It may be simple, but the BOSCH BS5678-6W bandsaw blade is a workhorse when you need to rip through wood. The general purpose blade fits most machines and makes quick work of long cuts with its 6 TPI pitch.

    The raker tooth set has a wide offset angle on the teeth, so the kerf is expansive, and the cuts are coarse. But given the blade’s size, it isn’t ideal for finesse work anyway, so you don’t lose too much with what looks like a rough design. Instead, you have a reliable and extra-efficient blade that can easily handle thick wood cuts and multiple boards.

    Pros
    • Fast cutting power for efficient ripping
    • Works with a wide array of bandsaws
    • Excellent price point
    Cons
    • Outward tooth angle creates a wide kerf
    • Doesn’t leave a smooth finish

    9. BOSCH BS80-15S Stationary Bandsaw Blade

    BOSCH Scroll Cutting Stationary Band Saw Blade

    Material: Steel
    Uses: Wood

    The relatively inexpensive BS80-15S from BOSCH is a narrow scroll-cutting blade for precision shaping. At 80” long and ⅛” thin, this is an excellent option in a hard-to-find style for hobbyists working on a full-size bandsaw.

    The BOSCH line of bandsaw blades is solid yet uninspiring. The blade design is practical though not too durable, but the price doesn’t give you much room for complaint. BOSCH also sells the scroll blade in an available set with either a ¼” or a ½” 6 TPI blade, giving you a pair that can handle delicate scrollwork and heavy-duty board cutting.

    Pros
    • Low price point
    • Available in a package with 6 TPI bandsaw blade
    Cons
    • May not work with older machines
    • Weld can be susceptible to breakage

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    Buyer’s Guide: How to Select the Best Bandsaw Blades

    Bandsaws are extremely versatile, giving you efficient cutting power to rip through all kinds of material but also the delicate touch to make intricate shapes. Still, as adaptable as the machine may be, the blades are specific for certain uses. Use the wrong one, and you could damage the material you’re cutting, break the saw teeth, or spend inordinate amounts of time on a project.

    There are several specs to mull over when you want to find the right blade for your project, particularly the blade width, pitch, shape, and material.

    Blade Width

    The blade width is the front-to-back measurement from the tooth tip to the rear edge. Proper blade width is crucial if you need to make turning cuts, as a wider blade will have a wider turning radius. If you have an ornate design to cut out, you’ll need a thin blade, like a ⅛” model. If you are doing straight cuts, as you would while ripping or resawing lumber, using one closer to an inch wide will be stronger and help you maintain a smooth edge.

    Teeth Per Inch

    Teeth per inch (TPI), also called the pitch, is what it sounds like—the number of teeth that take up one inch of blade length. A blade with fewer teeth will cut faster but leave a rough edge, so it’s ideal for cutting framing wood or other pieces where cutting efficiency outweighs aesthetics. A blade with more teeth will cut slower but leaves a smoother finish, perfect for showy wood displays and cross-cuts. It’s not ideal for large and long cuts, as it can cause the saw to bind up and potentially scorch the wood.

    There are a few rules of thumb when finding the right TPI. In general, softer materials like wood require fewer teeth, while metal and stone need a higher pitch, usually at least above 14 TPI.

    You will also find blades with variable TPIs, which are indicated with numbers like 10/14, meaning it’s 10 TPI at the furthest tooth distance and 14 at its tightest. The blades help reduce vibration, noise, and tooth stripping, and you get the fast ripping cuts of a low pitch blade with the smooth finish that comes with high TPI. Many see variable TPI blades, which often cost about the same as a constant-pitch blade, as the best of both worlds and the superior choice for a bandsaw.

    No matter the style, it’s crucial to use a pitch appropriate for the thickness of the material you’re cutting. With too few teeth, there could be a point where the blades don’t meet the cut and straddle it instead. The interrupted contact with the material can cause blades to break prematurely. With too many teeth, it can bind and clog. Blades with 12–14 TPI are generally good middle-of-the-road options for multi-purpose cutting.

    bandsaw cutter
    Image Credit: Anna Shvets, Pexels

    Set

    There are several bandsaw blade sets, which refer to how the teeth alternate down the blade. One of the most common is the raker set, where the first tooth sets to the left, the second sets to the right, and the third is straight. These are general use sets for uniform materials and contour cutting.

    You’ll also find wavy sets, which are fit for cutting thin metal sections like piping and tubes, and alternating tooth sets similar to the raker but without the centered tooth. It’s crucial to pay attention to the set, as it can affect the kerf and substantially affect the amount of wood waste.

    Tooth Style

    Another crucial consideration for your bandsaw project is the blade tooth type. Depending on what you’re cutting and how you need to cut it, you will choose one of three general styles:

    • Regular: General purpose blades with deep gullets and straight teeth
    • Skip: Teeth with wide gaps between them to reduce bogging down and wavy cuts
    • Hook: Teeth with positive rakes that aggressively cut through wood at high speeds

    Opt for a skip tooth or regular tooth blade if you want a smooth cut or a multi-purpose setup to tackle several different projects. Meanwhile, a hook tooth will do the most efficient work when you need to blast through wood, but the cut will be much rougher.

    Material

    There are several types of bandsaw blade constructions, each one having its ideal use. Carbon steel blades are some of the most common and cost-effective options for numerous materials, including wood, plastic, and non-ferrous metals. You’ll need to upgrade to either a bimetal or carbide blade for more heavy-duty materials, like steel and metal tubing.

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    Conclusion

    The Timber Wolf blade is an exceptional blend of performance features for many of the woodworking projects you would take to a bandsaw, which is why it earns the top spot in these bandsaw blade reviews. Our best value pick is the Olson Saw Bandsaw Blade for its versatility and ease of use. But every project has unique demands, and there is no one-size-fits-all blade to give you optimal results in every situation. With these perspectives on buying bandsaw blades and tips on finding the perfect design for the job, you’ll be sure to have the best possible experience.


    Featured Image Credit: Jade87, Pixabay

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