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13 Monster Truck Facts And Statistics (2022 Update)

White Monster Truck

Note: This article’s statistics come from third-party sources and do not represent the opinions of this website.

Monster trucks have been a favorite form of entertainment and excitement for decades. Since the 1970s, forms of monster trucks have raced, done tricks, and smashed several unsuspecting objects.

Whether you are just now learning about monster trucks or are an avid Monster Jam goer, there are a lot of things you probably don’t know about monster trucks. You can learn about 13 killer monster truck facts and stats including:

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The 13 Monster Truck Statistics and Facts

  1. Monster trucks were inspired by modified pickup trucks from the 1970s.
  2. Bob George is believed to have coined the phrase “monster truck.”
  3. The Monster Truck Racing Association was created in 1988.
  4. The phrase “Monster Jam” was first used in 1992.
  5. Freestyle exhibitions started in the 1990s.
  6. The biggest monster truck is Bigfoot 5.
  7. The longest monster truck is Sin City Hustler.
  8. Monster Jam trucks are all about the same size.
  9. All bodies are custom-built.
  10. Monster Jam trucks cost on average $250,000.
  11. Monster trucks are surprisingly safe.
  12. Monster truck accidents can cause the death of nondrivers.
  13. Monster trucks have helped save people.

History of the Monster Truck

Monster Truck Jumping
Image Credit: CraigL, Pixabay

1. Monster trucks were inspired by modified pickup trucks from the 1970s.

(The News Wheel)

As you might expect, monster trucks are a newer form of entertainment. In fact, the first form of monster truck didn’t come around until the 1970s. During this time, modified pickup trucks were being used for truck pulling and mud bogging. These trucks were seen in various competitions.

Eventually, certain drivers became particularly popular. Bob Chandler, Fred Schaefer, Jack Williams Sr., and Jeff Danes are examples of drivers of modified trucks that were very popular.

Even though these trucks were not technically monster trucks, this is where monster trucks began. The drivers who were popular during this time became innovative and important for the monster truck craze.


2. Bob George is believed to have coined the phrase “monster truck.”

(American Profile)

Even though modified trucks were popular as early as the 1970s, the phrase “monster truck” didn’t come about until the 1980s. Although it is unclear exactly when the term was first in use, legend has it that Truckarama owner Bob George used the phrase to describe the notorious monster truck, Bigfoot.

After this usage, “monster truck” became the phrase to describe all trucks with oversized tires. Since then, the phrase has been used to describe very particular vehicles, not just trucks with oversized tires.

Monster Truck
Image Credit: enki0908, Pixabay

3. The Monster Truck Racing Association was created in 1988.

(SCS Gearbox)

The monster truck fad continued to blow up. By 1988, the Monster Truck Racing Association was created by George Carpenter and Bob Chandler. The goal of the MTRA was to create a set safety standard to govern the trucks.

To this day, this organization is important for the sport of monster truck racing in the US and Europe.


4. The phrase “Monster Jam” was first used in 1992.

(Monster Jam)

When most people think of monster trucks, Monster Jam is one of the first pictures that come to mind. Monster Jam first began in 1992. It was part of the United States Hot Rod Association. Monster Jam today is now synonymous with powerhouse monster trucks.


5. Freestyle exhibitions started in the 1990s.

(Monster Truck Fandom)

Monster Jam is particularly loved because of its freestyle competition. Even though freestyle is now the most popular part of monster truck racing, it didn’t become popular until the 1990s.

The first freestyle exhibitions didn’t happen until 1993. It became popular with drivers like Dennis Anderson. Initially, it was just an opportunity for the drivers to perform in the case that they lost early rounds. Promoters saw how much fans loved freestyling, which caused the USHRA to hold freestyle competitions.divider 1

Average Size and Price of Monster Trucks

Rambo Monster Truck
Image Credit: Schocktime, Pixabay

6. The biggest monster truck is Bigfoot 5.

(Guinness World Records)

Although all monster trucks are big, the biggest one is Bigfoot 5. It was built in 1986, and its tires measure 10 feet across.


7. The longest monster truck is Sin City Hustler.

(Guinness World Records)

Whereas Bigfoot 5 is the biggest monster truck, the Sin City Hustler is the longest. It is 32 feet long. This extra-long monster truck was created in 2014 by Brad and Jen Campbell.


8. Monster Jam trucks are all about the same size.

(Monster Jam)

Even though monster trucks are bigger or longer than others, nearly all monster trucks have the same dimensions and size. Especially if they are in Monster Jam, you can expect the trucks to be very similar.

Every single monster truck that goes through Monster Jam is about 10.5 feet tall, 12.5 feet wide, and 17 feet long. Because of their similar size, they all are about 12,000 pounds. Even the horsepower within the trucks is similar. Monster Jam reports that their trucks are equipped with 1,500 horsepower.

Green Monster Truck
Image Credit: L0nd0ner, Pixabay

9. All bodies are custom-built.

(Monster Jam)

Interestingly, even though monster trucks all fit the same similar dimensions, every single truck is custom-built from fiberglass to withstand everything that the driver throws at the truck.

To get the monster trucks to and from different locations, they are transported on specially made trailers. These trailers are meant to accommodate each individual monster truck and house spare parts in case anything breaks.


10. Monster Jam trucks cost on average $250,000.

(Motor Verso)

Because of the custom build on each one of these monster trucks, you can expect a Monster Jam truck to cost around $250,000. Some trucks are worth even more due to their decked-out appearance.divider 1

Dangers of Monster Trucks

Monster Truck Balancing
Image Credit: CraigL, Pixabay

11. Monster trucks are surprisingly safe.

(Monster Truck Guide)

Because of the size and purpose of these trucks, many individuals assume that monster trucks are very dangerous. This is not the case. Monster trucks are equipped with a variety of safety features to ensure the drivers stay safe.

For example, monster trucks have three shutoff switches, including a remote ignition interrupt, a switch within the driver’s reach, and a shutoff in the back in case the monster truck gets rolled over.

The driver is also protected from a polycarbonate that surrounds the monster truck. Drivers are required to wear safety gear including fire suits, harnesses, helmets, and head and neck restraints.


12. Monster truck accidents can cause the death of nondrivers.

(Monster Truck Fandom)

Monster trucks are very safe for the driver, but they have caused a few deaths, though these deaths are rare. At a Monster Jam event in 2009, a 6-year-old was fatally injured due to flying debris.

There have also been cases of monster trucks running over other individuals. For example, there have been accidents where an announcer stepped in front of a monster truck while it was moving.

The deadliest monster truck accident happened in 2013. The truck Big Show drove into the crowd, killing eight people and injuring 79 others.

Monster Truck Face
Image Credit: CraigL, Pixabay

14. Monster trucks have helped save people.

(ABC News)

Although monster trucks have been responsible for several deaths, they have also helped to save people. In 2017, monster trucks were used to rescue individuals stranded due to Hurricane Harvey flooding.

These monster trucks were able to be used because the trucks had so much higher ground clearance that they could drive in the water without becoming flooded or immobilized.divider 1

Frequently Asked Questions About Monster Trucks

How big are monster trucks?

According to Monster Jam specifications, most monster trucks are about 10.5 feet tall, 12.5 feet wide, and 17 feet long, and they weigh about 12,000 pounds. Monster trucks that are not being shown at Monster Jam can be larger. (Monster Jam)

How big are the tires on monster trucks?

On average, monster truck tires are 66 inches tall and 43 inches wide. Each tire weighs about 900 pounds and has 10 PSI of air inside. (SCS Gearbox)

Monster Truck Crashing Cars
Image Credit: L0nd0ner, Pixabay

How heavy are monster trucks?

Monster trucks that perform at Monster Jam are about 12,000 pounds. Of course, monster trucks larger than the Monster Jam average are heavier. Bigfoot 5, for instance, is the world’s largest monster truck and weighs 38,000 pounds. (Auto Evolution)

How do drivers get into monster trucks?

Historically, monster truck drivers had to throw themselves into the truck to get inside. Today, monster trucks are made with a hatch located in the floor. This allows the driver to climb into the monster truck from underneath. (One Stop Racing)

How fast can monster trucks go?

Monster trucks typically go around 65 to 70 mph during a show. Outside of shows, most drivers only drive their vehicles to around 30 mph. This ensures a safe driving experience and increases the longevity of the truck. (SCS Gearbox)

Can a monster truck float on water?

Monster truck tires are typically made from flotation tires. The reason for this is so that it can hold more air and handle muddy conditions. However, monster trucks themselves cannot float on water since they are made from metal. (Monster Truck Fandom)

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Conclusion

As you can see, there are a lot of interesting facts and tidbits to know about monster trucks. From their large size to interesting use during hurricanes, monster trucks can be found practically everywhere.

Sources


Featured Image Credit: Schocktime, Pixabay

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